MTPR

University of Montana

University of Montana President Seth Bodnar talks to reporters about UM's future and his plans for tackling the university's budget shortfall, January 31, 2018.
Eric Whitney

University of Montana President Seth Bodnar says the school needs to find $10 million in spending cuts and revenue increases to bring its budget into balance by 2022.

William Dale Newhoff
Missoula County Sheriff's Office

A man police were chasing as an armed and dangerous federal fugitive in East Missoula this morning is in police custody tonight after being caught this afternoon.

About 11 o’clock Tuesday morning, a car chase ended in a truck crashing into a tree at an East Missoula mobile home court. William Dale Newhoff fled that scene on foot. 

University of Montana President Seth Bodnar
University of Montana

The University of Montana’s new president says UM is facing a defining moment. Seth Bodnar describes the university’s budgeting and enrollment challenges as ‘significant’.

UM’s enrollment has steadily declined since its all-time high of over 15,000 in the spring of 2011. Last fall there were just shy of 12,000 total students. University officials touted a 2 percent bump in freshmen enrollment last fall and they’re eager to build on that modest progress. Bodnar, now in his second week in Main Hall, says the path forward is fraught with challenge, but adds he’s confident UM’s best days are ahead of it.

Widlfire smoke fills the sky in Seeley Lake August  7, 2017.
Eric Whitney

This summer, Missoula County had its worst wildfire smoke season on record. It’s unclear how exactly that impacted the health of county residents, both as the fires were burning and longer term, but researchers are starting to pull in some data.

UM Investigates Pregnancy And Opioid Use In Montana

Dec 26, 2017
Jacqui Crisp of Columbia Falls lifts her squirmy daughter out of the stroller to carry her during a trip to the grocery store. Crisp moved to Montana to be near family who would support her through drug treatment and the final months of pregnancy.
Rikki Devlin for the Missoulian

Pregnant women using opioids in Montana aren’t receiving adequate care, according to a joint investigation by the Missoulian and the University of Montana Journalism School. As a result, more infants in Montana are being born dependent on narcotics. That means they can experience withdrawal symptoms - anywhere from fussiness and trouble feeding to seizures or death in extreme cases.

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