MTPR

weather

The current forecast is on track to keep temperatures well below normal, snow in the mountains, and rain for low elevation valleys through at least late September. It will be a good time to dust off those warm clothes and rain boots.
National Weather Service Missoula

The National Weather Service says the rain and snow western Montana is getting should continue through next week, and will potentially end this year’s fire season. The agency issued a winter storm warning for most of western Montana from 9 p.m. Thursday until 6 a.m. Saturday, anticipating a dramatic change to very cold, wet weather.

Meteorologist Jenn Kitsmiller expects that will clear out smoke from the region and slow down fire activity.

This was the second driest summer on record in Montana, but meteorologists say rain is finally on the way. 

Since July, the state has seen towns threatened by wildfires and choked with smoke, crops getting killed by drought and grass fires destroying rangeland. 

But a cold and rainy system entering Montana Thursday could put at least a temporary end to the suffering.

A cold front will begin to push into the Northern Rockies late this evening into Thursday. Breezy winds, along with scattered showers and thunderstorms associated with this system. Little beneficial rainfall is expected across the area.
National Weather Service Missoula

A couple of days of calm weather has blanketed much of Western Montana in thick smoke, but a cold front is moving in, and that has firefighters concerned.

Malinda Goldhirsch makes the initial attack on a fire near her home that started due to downed powerlines Thursday night.
Libby Goldhirsch

The dry thunderstorm that swept through the Flathead area last night set off dozens of spot fires, left about 5,000 houses without power for hours and previews what’s to come this weekend as a new weather front moves in.

Malinda Goldhirsch lives in Whitefish and got a firsthand taste of the powerful storm while watching TV with her family.

This is the worst fire season Montana has seen in years. The state is spending about $1.5 million dollars a day battling the blazes and meteorologists say they’re being fueled by something called a flash drought. 

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