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Fly-Fishing On Montana's Big Hole River, Signs Of Climate Change Are All Around

Jun 14, 2018
Nature is a powerful economic driver here, and livelihoods depend on cold water and healthy fish. People know it’s warming, but few will say that's climate change.
Meera Subramanian, InsideClimate News

Nature is a powerful economic driver here, and livelihoods depend on cold water and healthy fish. People know it’s warming, but few will say that's climate change.

Flooding in Missoula along the north end of Tower Street, May 7, 2018.
Josh Burnham

This year’s record snowpack is rapidly melting, and it started earlier than normal.

A levee on the Clark Fork River near Turah, MT eroded by floodwater, May 20, 2018.
Inciweb

Missoula’s historic flood season is still going strong, but the worst of it may be over.

First, the good news as delivered Monday by Missoula National Weather Service Meteorologist Jeff Kitzmiller.

A road closed sign in a flooded Missoula neighborhood, May 12, 2018.
Inciweb

Flooding continues to be a concern on rivers and streams across western and central Montana. In Missoula, evacuation orders are still in place for 65 homes, with warnings posted for an additional 2,200 more. But there’s at least a glimmer of good news for the Clark Fork River above Missoula.

A sign at the flood information trailer in Missoula, MT, May 11, 2018.
Josh Burnham

The Clark Fork River above Missoula today receded by over two feet from Friday night’s high of 13.82 feet; its highest crest since 1908. But that doesn't mean the worst of the flooding is behind us.

"Even though the rivers have gone down now, lets not be complacent cause they’re going to be headed right back up Thursday through Saturday,” says National Weather Service Meteorologist Bob Nester.

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