Yellowstone National Park

Two orphaned Yellowstone grizzly cubs will be going to the Toledo Zoo.
Flickr user Carl Berger (CC-BY-NC-2.0)

The two cubs of a Montana grizzly bear that killed a hiker in Yellowstone National Park are going to an Ohio zoo.

Yellowstone Kills Bear Involved In Fatal Attack

Aug 13, 2015
YellowstoneNPS (CC-BY-2.0)

Yellowstone Park Officials have killed the adult bear implicated in the fatal attack on Lance Crosby. A Monday autopsy concluded that Lance Crosby was killed by a bear. DNA analysis confirmed that the adult bear captured at the scene of the attack was involved in the fatal mauling. Park officials say the decision to kill the bear was influenced by the fact that the bear partially consumed the body and cached it for later.

An autopsy has confirmed that a grizzly bear was responsible for the death of a hiker in Yellowstone National Park late last week. And, a second bear cub related to the incident has now been captured.

Jim Peaco, via YNP

Yellowstone National Park has identified the hiker who is believed to have been killed by a grizzly bear late last week. Park Superintendent Dan Wenk says he was from Billings.

"Lance Crosby was an employee of Medcor, our concession facility that provides medical services here in the park.  (He was) 63 years old, had been in the park with Medcor for approximately 5 years" Wenk said.

An investigation is currently underway to determine the cause of death of a Montana hiker found in the park Friday.
Flickr user lance_mountain (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Identity of Victim in Grizzly Attack Released

A 63-year old man from Billings, Montana, has been identified as the victim of last week’s grizzly bear attack in Yellowstone. Around noon on Friday, August 7, Lance Crosby was found dead approximately .5 miles from the Elephant Back Loop Trail in a popular off-trail area in the Lake Village area of the park. Crosby was a long-term seasonal employee of Medcor, the company that operates three urgent care clinics in the park. He had worked and lived in Yellowstone for five seasons and was an experienced hiker. 

Eric Whitney

Yellowstone National Park's response to the death of Montana man while hiking in the park late last week is drawing criticism.

Yellowstone Responds To Bear Killing Policy Criticism

Aug 10, 2015
Eric Whitney

Yellowstone National Park posted the response below on its Facebook page after receiving criticism over after it said it plans to trap and kill the bear involved in the death of a hiker in the park late last week. The park says they captured a suspect bear in the area Friday. 

Yellowstone Seeking Grizzly Involved Montana Man's Death

Aug 8, 2015
Courtesy NPS

Preliminary results of the investigation into the recent death of a hiker in Yellowstone National Park show that the man was attacked by a grizzly bear. While the exact cause of death has not been determined, investigators have identified what appear to be defensive wounds on the victim’s forearms.

Bison and snowcoaches share the road (NPS Photo)
Courtesy National Park Service

Groups that once argued fiercely over motorized winter travel in Yellowstone National Park are now praising a new policy first tried out last winter. They’ll be talking over the Park’s winter management plan Monday morning.

An investigation is currently underway to determine the cause of death of a Montana hiker found in the park Friday.
Flickr user lance_mountain (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Yellowstone National Park says An investigation is currently underway to determine the cause of death of a Montana hiker found in the park Friday.

Montana FWP is holding public hearings on bison management in the state.
(PD)

Tuesday Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks begins a series of public hearings to gauge support for a publicly-managed bison herd. Whatever the state decides to do, FWP spokesman Tom Palmer says the interests of the livestock industry will be taken into account.

Emigrant Peak, near the area of the proposed mine exploration
Flickr user Sean Wolf (CC-BY-NC-ND-2.0)

Caroline Byrd describes south-central Montana's scenic Emigrant Gulch in the Paradise Valley as Yellowstone National Park's "northern backdoor".

"It's got wildlife. It's got water. It's got scenic beauty and it's got real ecological importance for keeping the whole place knit together," says Byrd.

Byrd, the executive director of the Greater Yellowstone Coalition says that's no place for a mine.

Emigrant Peak, near a proposed mine exploration site.
Richard Reeve (CC-BY-SA-2)

Environmentalists say a Canadian company's request to explore for gold and other elements south of Livingston puts the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem at risk.

Lucky Minerals Incorporated wants to explore a six square-mile area for copper, molybdenum and gold in Emigrant Gulch in the Custer Gallatin National Forest and on private land nearby.

Public Domain

A panel of prominent scientists are meeting in Bozeman to talk about controlling brucellosis in the Greater Yellowstone area, It’s the start of a year-long process to evaluate options for trying to control the disease.

Another Tourist Injured By Yellowstone Bison

Jun 2, 2015
Bull bison in Yellowstone National Park
YellowstoneNPS-flickr (CC-BY-2.0)

A 62-year-old Australian is the second Yellowstone National Park visitor to be injured by a bison this year.

Snowmobiles ride past bison in Yellowstone National Park
Yellowstone National Park (CC-BY-2.0)

A national conservation group and a motorized access group describe a proposed winter use management tool for Yellowstone National Park as a step in the right direction.

Public Domain

The public is getting a chance to ask state and federal wildlife managers about bison management in and around Yellowstone National Park.

The federal government's point man on grizzly bears says the Yellowstone ecosystem's grizzly population should be removed from the endangered species list.

Chris Servheen says the most accurate population estimate shows between 1,000 and 1,200 grizzly bears in the Yellowstone ecosystem.

Some Yellowstone Roads To Open This Week

Apr 14, 2015
Snowplows near the Canyon area in Yellowstone National Park
David Restivo, Yellowstone National Park (CC-BY-2.0)

Spring is in the air and the plows have been busy in Yellowstone. Now, roads leading to Old Faithful and the Grand Canyon area are set to open for auto travel this week.

Cow bison with a newly born calf in Yellowstone National Park
Neal Herbert - Yellowstone National Park (CC-BY-2.0)

Yellowstone National Park might tolerate thousands more bison by 2017, or perhaps hundreds fewer. State and federal wildlife managers are developing a new Yellowstone bison management plan and several options are on the table.

Jackie Yamanaka

Another nearly 4-dozen Yellowstone National Park bison are scheduled to be loaded up today at the Stephens Creek Capture facility and delivered for slaughter in Big Timber and Columbus.

It’s part of the population control measures spelled out under the Interagency Bison Management Plan.

Yellowstone officials held a tour of the Stephens Creek facility yesterday.

Rick Wallen is the lead wildlife biologist for Yellowstone’s bison program.

Relatively mild winter weather is bringing out the bears in Yellowstone National Park.

Park spokesman Al Nash says the first report of grizzly bear activity was confirmed late Monday afternoon.

The bears usually emerge from hibernation in early March.

They're hungry when leaving their dens and looking for an easy meal; namely, the carcasses of winter-killed animals.

Jim Peaco (CC-BY-2.0)

Yellowstone National Park has started capturing bison near the park's north entrance and bison advocates have sued to stop it.

Disease management and carrying capacity are at the center of the operation.

Park spokesman Al Nash says a total of 800 to 900 bison that migrate out of the park could be removed.

"We're doing so to be able to approach the target bison population and to see if we can reduce the potential for a mass-migration of bison into Montana where there is still some limited tolerance."

Wolves A Source Of Wonder, Controversy 20 Years After Reintroduction

Jan 13, 2015
Jim Peaco (CC-BY-2.0)

Monday marked the 20th anniversary of the arrival of 8 wolves into Yellowstone National Park. That event marked the beginning of the recovery effort for the grey wolf, a species that had been absent from the Northern Rockies for more than 70 years.

Several of the former National Park Service and U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service officials in the recovery effort met Sunday and Monday to reflect on the effort and consider the future of the grey wolf.

Flickr user, Charles Peterson

"By the 1930s, conservation groups across North America teamed up to help save the trumpeter, of which only 69 were known to exist. Various projects restored and increased breeding, wintering and wetland habitat, including the new Red Rock Lakes National Wildlife Refuge in southwest Montana. Trumpeter populations rebounded and reached almost 35,000 swans by 2005.

Jim Peaco (CC-BY-2.0)

Yellowstone National Park officials hope a smartphone and tablet app sparks curiosity about science and the nation's park system.

The app called "NPS Yellowstone Geyers".

Park spokesman Al Nash says it helps users find out when Old Faithful and five other predictable geysers could erupt.

"We're looking to see how we can harness technology to help us better serve visitors."

Yellowstone Ski Festival

 

With the Thanksgiving holiday comes the unofficial start of the ski season in much of the Northwest. Tuesday marks the start of the Yellowstone Ski Festival, an event that draws up to five thousand cross country skiers to the trails just outside the national park every year.

“We’ve had skiers out here skiing on our trails since weekend when we got a good batch of snow," said Moira Dow, festival's director.

Courtesy of the Defenders of Wildlife

Nearly 2,000 pounds of wild bison lumbered out of a truck and down a ramp yesterday onto a pasture owned by the the Assiniboine & Sioux Tribes of the Fort Peck Reservation as members of the tribe greeted the animals with a song.

Dozens of excited people were there to see workers herd the animals into a 140 acre holding pen. Fort Peck Fish and Game officials said almost 100 bison were unloaded yesterday, with nearly 50 more expected today.

Montana FWP is holding public hearings on bison management in the state.
(PD)

A herd of wild bison relocated from Yellowstone National Park arrived at Montana's Fort Peck Indian Reservation today.

The bison were initially captured migrating out of the park, and were kept on media mogul Ted Turner’s ranch for the last five years.

Tommy Christian is a 15-year member of the Assiniboine & Sioux tribal council. He says many tribes, including those he represents on Fort Peck, have a strong relationship with the animals, and have only recently been able to express it since hunters nearly massacred the entire species.

Grizzly bears in the Yellowstone ecosystem are close to losing their endangered species status.

Chris Servheen says that population is healthy, robust and ready for that transition.

Servheen is the Grizzly Bear Recovery Coordinator for the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

He and other members of an Interagency Grizzly Bear Management subcommittee met yesterday in Bozeman to discuss the status of Yellowstone grizzly bears.

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