MTPR

Yellowstone National Park

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service plans to turn over grizzly bear management to Montana, Idaho and Wyoming by late July. The states plan to allow limited bear hunts outside park boundaries.
Flickr user Nathan Rupert (CC-BY-NC-ND-2)

The Interior Department Thursday said it will lift Endangered Species Act protections for grizzly bears in the Yellowstone National Park region.

Those protections have been in place for more than 40 years.

Grizzly bear in Yellowstone National Park.
U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service

Endangered Species Act protections for grizzly bears that have been in place for more than three decades are poised to be peeled back soon. This week state and federal land managers from the Rocky Mountain west are meeting talk about what that means for the future of grizzly bear management and recovery.

The Interagency Grizzly Bear Committee, or IGBC is spending three days in Choteau this week working on a five-year-plan to guide management of grizzlies as the bear’s population grows.

Location of the earthquakes that are part of the swarm as of June 19, 2017 at 13:30 MDT (red symbols).
Courtesy University of Utah Seismograph Stations

Geologists in Yellowstone National Park have now detected more than 500 earthquakes in the past week. The ongoing earthquake swarm is one of the larger ones the park has seen.

Yellowstone typically sees between 1,500 and 2,000 earthquakes a year. About half of those will occur during a swarm, like the one going on now in the northwest corner of the park.

Free Heel and Wheel in West Yellowstone
Photo courtesy of Tripadvisor

Earthquakes continue to shake the area west of Yellowstone National Park today. A sequence of about 30 earthquakes magnitude 2 and larger have hit the area since Monday.

Yesterday a 4.5 magnitude quake occurred in a backcountry area at 6:48 PM, near West Yellowstone. 

Yellowstone Lake
FLICKR USER, Yu-Hsin Hung (CC-BY-NC-ND-2.0)

There’s been a second death in Yellowstone National Park in just over a week. The Park says a kayak guide died yesterday while attempting to rescue a client who capsized in the West Thumb area of Yellowstone Lake.

Clepsydra geyser, Yellowstone National Park, lower geyser basin
Flickr user, Dawn Ellner (CC-BY-2.0)

A 21-year-old North Carolina man suffered severe burns after falling into a hot spring in Yellowstone National Park. Park officials say Gervais Dylan Gatete, an employee of park concessionaire Xanterra Parks and Resorts, fell into a hot spring in the Lower Geyser Basin just north of Old Faithful late Tuesday. 

Livestock carcass composting site outside Wisdom, MT.
Courtesy of the Big Hole Watershed Committee

Livestock death is part of ranching. At some point, ranchers have to deal with dead animals, from things like difficult births, disease, and weather extremes. And in southwest Montana, those dead animals can also attract unwelcome visitors — wolves and black bears looking for an easy meal.

One of the Yellowstone National Park's best-known wolves had to be put down after being found injured.
Neal Herbert/NPS

Yellowstone National Park has increased the reward for information about the shooting of one of the park’s most well-known wolves. This more than a month after offering an initial reward.

2015 photo of the female wolf from Yellowstone's Canyon pack. The wolf was found mortally wounded from a gunshot on April 11 near Gardiner, MT.
Jim Peaco - Yellowstone National Park (PD)

The investigation continues into the shooting of a wolf that was popular with Yellowstone National Park tourists.

Yellowstone spokeswoman Morgan Warthin says hikers discovered the mortally wounded wolf on April 11:

Researchers To Trap Grizzly, Black Bears In Yellowstone

May 3, 2017
Researchers will begin trapping grizzly and black bears Sunday in Yellowstone National Park.
(PD)

BOZEMAN, Mont. (AP) — Researchers will begin trapping grizzly and black bears Sunday in Yellowstone National Park.

The trapping is an effort to gather data on the protected grizzly bears as part of long-term research required under the Endangered Species Act.

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