MTPR

zebra mussels

That green and brown gunk is a mix of algae, plankton and bits of genetic material that hold the answer to whether Flathead Lake has mussels in it. One sample comes from 9 meters deep, the other from the surface.
Nicky Ouellet

Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks Thursday announced it detected additional evidence of invasive mussels in one eastern Montana reservoir last summer. The detection raises a few red flags.

FWP found microscopic invasive baby mussels in Tiber and Canyon Ferry Reservoirs for the first time in the fall of 2016. But the state agency and its partners didn’t find any last summer.

Stop aquatic hitchhikers. Be a good steward. Clean. Drain. Dry.
stopaquatichitchhikers.org

Welcome to the fifth and final episode of "SubSurface: Resisting Montana’s Underwater Invaders." Today we’re putting our producer Nicky Ouellet in the hot seat to answer some listener questions about mussels.

Learn more about how you can help stop the spread of aquatic invasive species, on this episode of SubSurface.

FWP has inspected more than 23,000 watercraft as part of its effort to keep the mussels, which can cause millions of dollars of damage to hydropower dams and irrigation systems, out of Montana’s waterways.
Katrin Frye

Agencies responding to the discovery of invasive mussels in two Montana reservoirs east of the continental divide last year are working to better align their prevention programs.

Mussels on a rock at Geneva Lake in Wisconsin.
Nicky Ouellet

We’ve heard in previous episodes what it’s like to live with invasive zebra and quagga mussels: the costs they can impose, the changes they bring, the clarity they leave in their wake. We learned how they spread, and how managers are working to stay in front of their advances into Big Sky Country. But what if they get here anyway? What are options then? And what does this invasion mean for the landscape? For us? Today in the fourth episode of SubSurface, we’re looking at Plan B, and thinking about what the mussel invasion tells us about ourselves. This is Active Resistance.

A pile of mussels shells from a lake in Wisconsin.
Nicky Ouellet

  

Everyone agrees that the goal is to stop invasive zebra and quagga mussels from spreading, but there isn’t consensus on how to do that. This is where Montana is right now. There are a lot of different groups — state, tribal, federal, local and non-government — working to keep the mussels out, but they’re all working under different systems, with different rules to follow and different ideas about how to move forward.

Today we’re asking: Where are we cooperating, and where are we entangled in bureaucracy? This is SubSurface episode three: Shell Games.

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