MTPR

J.J. Cale, A Man Less Famous Than His Songs

Monday, November 18th, 2013, 7:30pm: host Tom Engelmann returns with another episode of "Unsung Heroes: Influential but Overlooked Masters of Modern Music," profiling the work of the late guitarist and songwriter J.J. Cale.

Known mostly as a songwriter for Eric Clapton, John Weldon  “J.J.” Cale wrote compositions that were recorded by Lynyrd Skynyrd, Kansas, Poco, Waylon Jennings and numerous others.   Songs written by Cale that have been covered by other musicians include "After Midnight," "Cocaine," "Clyde" and "Call Me the Breeze." In 2008 he was a Grammy Award winner, jointly with Clapton.

Evening Newscast 03-21-17

3 hours ago
Montana Evening Newscast
Josh Burnham

News broke this morning that Democratic congressional candidate Rob Quist had three liens filed against him by the state of Montana to collect about $15,000 in back taxes.

Legislative analysts have released a new forecast that paints a rosier economic picture for Montana.

The House Appropriations Committee is expected to vote this week on a bill that would give a one-percent pay raise for state employees.

Greg Gianforte (L) and Rob Quist (R) are running for Congress in a special election to fill Ryan Zinke's seat.
MTPR News

Today news broke that the two major party candidates in Montana's special election for Congress have had tax liens filed against them in the past.

The Associated Press says that, "a group seeking to influence the May 25 special election" gave them information about liens against Democrat Rob Quist. The Democratic Party responded by providing information about Republican Greg Gianforte.

After a day of statements, Tuesday's Supreme Court confirmation hearing was all about answers. Judge Neil Gorsuch was careful in his responses to Senate Judiciary Committee members, but there were still a number of insights that marked the day. Read our full Day 2 coverage here. These are five highlights:

Bill Could Strip Worker’s Compensation For Failure To Disclose Medical Conditions

5 hours ago
Montana Capitol dome, Helena.
William Marcus

Montana lawmakers heard a bill today that would add another aspect to worker’s compensation cases. Senate Bill 116 could strip employees of worker’s comp eligibility if they knowingly or willfully failed to disclose a medical condition pertinent to a job in any pre-employment questionnaires.

State Employees Seek Modest Pay Raise

5 hours ago

The House Appropriations Committee is expected to vote this week on a bill that would give a one-percent pay raise for state employees.


The House Appropriations committee unanimously approved a bill to pay for some capital improvement projects for numerous state facilities.  The committee’s action came after several lawmakers criticized building projects at the University of Montana.

House Bill 5 includes a myriad of projects, including for several life/safety repairs and maintenance at state facilities. The committee approved an amendment to give the Montana University System the authority to spend money raised privately by some of the campuses.


Montana Capitol, Helena.
William Marcus

Montana could see as much as $106 million in additional revenue come into the state than was previously unexpected. But lawmakers are approaching this news with some caution as they create the state’s budget.

The state’s nonpartisan Legislative Fiscal Division is projecting the additional revenue to flow into state coffers over the next three years, as the state recovers from a dip in earnings after a decline created, in part, by lower sales of coal, oil, and gas. 

Chicago police say they've located a missing teenage girl who was sexually assaulted in an attack streamed live on Facebook.

The Associated Press reports that the girl was apparently raped "by five or six men or boys" in the video, which was watched live by dozens of people.

It's the second incident in the past three months where an apparent violent crime in Chicago, with multiple assailants, was broadcast live on Facebook as it happened.

On Tuesday morning, the Department of Homeland Security announced new restrictions for personal electronics on direct flights to the U.S. from 10 airports in the Middle East and North Africa. Devices larger than a cellphone will not be allowed in the cabin, though they will be allowed in checked baggage.

Later Tuesday, the U.K. announced it would be enforcing a similar rule — using a slightly different list of countries.

The rule change in both countries was unexpected and the explanations for it cryptic.

Here's a quick look at what we know, and what we don't.

On Fashion Runways, Inclusion Is About More Than Color

7 hours ago

Designers are rolling out their spring lines and the runways are looking more diverse than ever. But the comparative abundance of models who are people of color didn't happen overnight.

There was the occasional — very occasional — model who wasn't white in the 50s and early 60s on runways. But African-American models put American couture on the map in 1973 when they walked the runway in France in what's become known as The Battle of Versailles.

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