Chérie Newman

Arts and Culture Producer

Chérie Newman is an arts and humanities producer and on-air host for Montana Public Radio, and a freelance writer. Her weekly literary program, The Write Question, is broadcast on several public radio stations, and available online at PRX.org and MTPR.org.

Her articles, essays, and book reviews have been published in Montana Magazine, High Country News, the University of Montana Alumni Newsletter, Whitefish Review, the Billings Gazette, the Missoulian, Montana Senior News, Outside Bozeman Magazine, and on numerous websites.

Ways to Connect

Trinity University Press

About the book:

In Crossing the Plains with Bruno, Annick Smith weaves together a memoir of travel and relationship, western history and family history, human love and animal love centering around a two week road trip across the Great Plains she and 95 pound chocolate lab, Bruno, took in the summer of 2003. It is a chain of linked meditations, often triggered by place, about how the past impinges on the present and how the present can exist seemingly sans past.

Traveling from her rural homestead in Montana to pick up her nearly 100-year-old mother from her senior residence on Chicago’s North Side and bring her to the family’s beach house on a dune overlooking Lake Michigan, Smith often gets lost in memory and rambling contemplation. Bruno’s constant companionship and ever present needs force her to return to the actual, reminding her that she, too, is an animal whose existence depends on being alert to the scents, sights, hungers, and emotions of the moment.

Delacorte Books for Young Readers

This is Logan, here to tell you about Going where it’s Dark, a book for young adult readers written by Phyllis Reynolds Naylor.

Going where it’s Dark by Phyllis Reynolds Naylor is a very exciting book, and I couldn’t put it down once I started reading it. The main character is Buck Anderson, a thirteen-year-old boy who struggles with problems, including bullying and stuttering. He overcomes the bullying problem but instead of learning how to not stutter, he learns how to not fight it and be able to stutter more easily.

Adventure Cycling Association

After 25-year-old McKinley Bryson rode the TransAmerica Bicycle Trail from the Pacific Ocean to the Atlantic, she wrote, “...there is way more good in this world than bad. I met the most wonderful, generous people… .” And editor of a new book called America’s Bicycle Route: The Story of the TransAmerica Bicycle Trail, Greg Siple, says many other riders have told similar stories.

cover image: Kim Heacox / Alaska Northwest Books

About Jimmy Bluefeather:

Old Keb Wisting is somewhere around ninety-five years old (he lost count awhile ago) and in constant pain and thinks he wants to die. He also thinks he thinks too much. Part Norwegian and part Tlingit Native (“with some Filipino and Portuguese thrown in”), he’s the last living canoe carver in the village of Jinkaat, in Southeast Alaska.

Los Angeles Times and NPR film critic Kenneth Turan talks about and reads from his book Not To Be Missed: Fifty-Four Favorites from a Lifetime of Film.

If you’ve ever wanted to chat with a major film critic in person, you may soon get that chance.

Colin Mutchler (CC-BY-2)

"The Pea Green Boat" provides a unique and nurturing place to hear stories about how it feels to be excluded, mocked, and bullied because you’re different, in color or ability – or how it feels to be accepted despite those differences. This week, Annie talks with 9-year-old Dutch about his hearing loss and how he felt when he discovered he was different. She also talks with Dutch's mother and his speech language therapist about teaching Dutch to advocate for himself.

Seal Press

Overwhelmed with her fast-paced, competitive lifestyle, Amy Ragsdale moved with her husband, writer Peter Stark, and their two teenage children from the U.S. to a small town in northeastern Brazil, where she hoped they would learn the value of a slower life.

'Burn'

Jun 27, 2016
Lost Horse Press

by Katrina Roberts

A tower of bales suddenly aflame in Yakima makes
news. Not dry enough, a static flash, indeterminate

cause, though vast lost. Next day, crisp grass beneath
the Ford so he slicks it off. But these things, like sparks

from exhaust—we understand them. What of the wick
effect, spontaneous combustion of human flesh: torso

and arms consumed; bare skull, lower legs intact, rooms
left relatively uncharred while the TV-watcher flares,

Gerolf Nikolay

"The Pea Green Boat" provides a unique and nurturing place to hear stories about how it feels to be excluded, mocked, and bullied because you’re different, in color or ability – or how it feels to be accepted despite those differences. This week, Annie facilitates conversations with middle-school students and a teacher, Caroline Patterson, about isolation. Students write poetry about their feelings during this classroom session and then read their poems.

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