Chérie Newman

Producer and On-Air Host

Chérie Newman is an arts and humanities producer and on-air host for Montana Public Radio, and a freelance writer. Her weekly literary program, The Write Question, is broadcast on several public radio stations, and available online at PRX.org and MTPR.org.

Her articles, essays, and book reviews have been published in Montana Magazine, High Country News, the University of Montana Alumni Newsletter, Whitefish Review, the Billings Gazette, the Missoulian, Montana Senior News, Outside Bozeman Magazine, and on numerous websites.

Ways To Connect

Bruce Holbert talks about his new novel, The Hour of Lead. He also explains how the Myth of the West damages human relationships and why the bad guys still get the girls.

About the book:

Tim O'Brien talks about his ever-popular novel 'The Things They Carried and describes the difference between literal truth and story truth. He also talks about writing as art and reads a passage from the book.

During this program, four Montana Indian authors talk about their stories published in Off the Path: An Anthology of 21st Century Montana American Indian Writers, Vol. I.

Sherman Alexie is not the only American Indian writer. Nor does the experience of one Indian represent the experiences of all Natives living in urban areas and reservations across the U.S.

That point of view, plus insights into American Indian culture and tribal differences, is part of the discussion during this program.

For Today I Am A Boy

Oct 29, 2014

Kim Fu talks about and reads from her debut novel, For Today I Am A Boy.

About the book:

Peter Huang and his sisters—elegant Adele, shrewd Helen, and Bonnie the bon vivant— grow up in a house of many secrets, then escape the confines of small-town Ontario and spread from Montreal to California to Berlin. Peter’s own journey is obstructed by playground bullies, masochistic lovers, Christian ex-gays, and the ever-present shadow of his Chinese father.

During this program, Paul Zarzyski talks about and reads from his latest collections of poetry and prose, Steering With My Knees and 51: 30 Poems, 20 Lyrics, 1 Self-Interview, both published by Bangtail Press.

Including:

Poem For October 20

Oct 20, 2014

Today's poem is untitled. It was published in chasers of the light: poems from the typewriter series, by Tyler Knot Gregson.

What good
is a half-lit
life?
You
can burn me
to ashes
as long as I know
we lived a life
alight.

Wyoming author Alexandra Fuller talks about and reads from her third memoir, Cocktail Hour Under the Tree of Forgetfulness.

About the book:

John Zolteck, Music Director and Conductor for the Glacier Symphony and Chorale, talks with Michael Marsolek about this weekend's concert.

"Electrifying 17-year-old Simone Porter wowed our audience last summer during Festival Amadeus.  Our performance of Paganini's virtuoso concerto promises to be absolutely Spellbinding!"

Saturday, October 11, 2014
7:30 - 9:30 p.m. at Flathead High School Performance Hall

Pete Fromm talks about and reads from his latest novel, If Not For This

About the book:

Bryce Andrews talks about his decision to move to a cattle ranch in Montana and about the memoir he wrote about his experiences there, Badluck Way. He also reads two passages from the book.

About the Book:

 

The Missoula Symphony Orchestra returns to the stage for the first concert of its 60th Season with a concert titled, "Music, Love, and Other Drugs."

Featuring Tim Fain, Violin Soloist

October 4 - 7:30 p.m.
October 5 - 3:00 p.m.
Dennison Theatre

Carol Bradley, author of Last Chain on Billie: How One Extraordinary Elephant Escaped the Big Top, talks about the cruel lives of circus elephants and what we can do to stop it.

Utah author James Dashner talks about a few of the 16 books he's written, including The Maze Runner, which is now a feature film. He also describes the process of turning his childhood dream to be an author into reality.

About the book:

Joe Ashbrook Nickell talks about and reads from 'Tainted Revelations,' the book he wrote about painter and sculptor Bill Ohrmann.

Bill Ohrmann only began seriously painting when he retired from ranching in 1996. Since then, the 95-year-old Montana artist has produced hundreds of canvases that explore his blistering criticism of the modern West. His direct, narrative paintings, often inspired by quotations from his favorite poets and environmental writers, are by turns wry, apocalyptic, horrifying and hilarious.

Carrie La Seur talks about and reads from The Home Place, a mystery novel in which a successful lawyer is pulled back into her troubled family’s life in rural Montana in the wake of her sister’s death.

About the book:

Tom Zavitz painting

When ten-year-old Carlita Milkey bewitches nine-year-old Jaybird, he decides to win her love by giving her her heart's desire:  the biggest, most expensive package of fireworks available at Mr. Oltrogee's fireworks stand. But he doesn't have $19.95. So, he decides to stage an elaborate robbery.

In this short clip from The Church of Pancakes Jaybird and his friends meet to finalize the plan.

During this program Pulitzer Prize-winning author Richard Ford talks about and reads from his latest novel, Canada. He also considers character motivation, aging, the usefulness of fiction, and the many border crossings in the novel.

About the book:

First, I'll tell about the robbery our parents committed. Then the murders, which happened later.

Michael Marsolek talks with Helene and Lucien Werner about the quartet's performance at St. Timothy's Summer Music Festival, August 24.

During this program, Christine Byl talks about her memoir, Dirt Work: An Education in the Woods, which describes her experiences working on trail crews in national parks in Montana and Alaska.

Michael Marsolek talks with David Feffer, Crown of the Continent Guitar Foundation Chairman and Founding Director, and 16-year-old guitar prodigy Solomon Hicks about this year's festival.

Malcolm Brooks talks about researching and writing his debut novel, Painted Horses.

About the book:

Eliza Wiley/Independent Record

Steve Browning went from self-absorbed teen to a lawyer working in high-level politics, law, and philanthropy. What caused the shift from self-focus to citizenship, and what was learned along the way?

Brian Kahn talks with Browning about all that and more during this episode of Home Ground Radio.

(Broadcast: Home Ground Radio, 8/12/14)

Jazz vocalist Eden Atwood talks with Michael Marsolek about music, teaching, and her appearance at St. Timothy's Summer Music Festival, Sunday, August 10, at 4 p.m.

St. Timothy’s Summer Music Festival is celebrating its 19th season at St. Timothy’s Memorial Chapel,  a superb acoustical venue located at 7000 feet with beautiful views of the Pintler Mountains and Georgetown Lake.

Los Angeles Times and NPR film critic Kenneth Turan talks about and reads from his book Not To Be Missed: Fifty-Four Favorites from a Lifetime of Film.

Smith Henderson talks about and reads from his debut novel, Fourth of July Creek.

About the book:

Publisher Allen Jones talks about "re-invigorating" Bangtail Press and three recently-released anthologies of Montana writers, the Treasure State Readers.

Montana Bookstore Readers

Montana Then And Now

Jul 16, 2014

Hear fascinating facts about Montana's 150 years as a territory and a state during this interview with Aaron Parrett, author of Montana Then And Now.

Laura Pritchett talks about and reads from Stars Go Blue, a novel in which a Colorado rancher and his wife deal with his diagnosis of Alzheimer's.

TWQ producer Chérie Newman, Barbara Theroux, manager of Fact & Fiction Bookstore in Missoula, and Zed talk about recently-published books by authors from the western U.S.

NONFICTION

How To Read the American West:  A Field Guide, by William Wycokoff

Hiking Montana:  35th Anniversary Edition, by Bill Schneider an Russ Schneider

Tom Zavitz painting

Part 3 in Notes From the Huntley Project series of radio plays by Jay Kettering.

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